Jamie Anderson, Singer - Songwriter - Parking Lot Attendant


cover of the new cd: dare

Dare

Produced by Jamie Anderson and Chris Rosser
Tsunami Recordings -- Ottawa, Ontario

This album is lovingly dedicated to Gary Anderson, the boy who wanted to fly.

  • Recorded and mixed by Chris Rosser, at Hollow Reed Arts in Asheville, NC
  • Mastered by Michael Hynes at Nomatic Studio
  • Duplicated by Oasis CD
  • Photos by Woodland Willow Photography (Monika Shakinovsky)
  • Design by Sally Rogers Devine at Red Horse Graphics

All songs written by Jamie Anderson (BMI) ©2006 – 2013, except "The Dream," lyrics by Lois Hoover and music by Jamie Anderson, © 2012 Lois Hoover and Jamie Anderson

    Musicians:
  • Jamie Anderson – lead and backing vocals, acoustic guitar, mandolin, Dad’s ukulele
  • Kara Barnard – acoustic and electric guitar, mandolin
  • River Guerguerian – cajon, doumbek, drum set, kanjira, riq, shakers
  • Chris Rosser – keyboards, cumbus-oud
  • Tory Trujillo – backing vocals
  • Eliot Wadopian – string bass, fretted and fretless six-string basses

Here are the songs from Dare -- click on ‘expand’ to see details.

1. Dare expand | collapse
Inspired by a conversation I had with a woman in a bar. Be careful what you say to a songwriter.

2. Black and White expand | collapse
Inspired by something my friend Ted Warmbrand says. He’s a songwriter, too, so I told him if he wasn’t going to write the song, I would. He gave me the go-ahead.

3. Run expand | collapse
This was written with input from my Facebook friends. Sadly, most of these things are true. I made up the one about the tattoo, though, because "bum" is a good rhyme for "run." However, don’t do what I did, and google "ugly butt tattoo" because your retinas will be forever burned.

4. Mamaw’s Roses expand | collapse

5. Bellydancer expand | collapse

6. Yoga Teacher expand | collapse
I actually love my yoga teacher and not for the reasons outlined here.

7. The Dream expand | collapse
Words by Lois Hoover
Music by Jamie Anderson

I wrote my first songs back in the 70’s with Lois. We lost contact in the 80’s and then found each other recently. She told me she wasn’t writing poetry anymore, but a few months later, I found these words in my inbox. I wrote a melody and performed it at the National Women’s Music Festival in 2012. She was in the front row.

8. Holy Place expand | collapse
I started this one because I was mad at someone who’d cut off communication with me. Then I heard Dolly Parton in an interview, talking about someone similar in her life, and she said, “Honey, get off the cross, somebody needs the wood.” I took the religious imagery and ran with it.

9. The Boy Who Wanted to Fly expand | collapse
When going through some of Dad’s things, I found the crayon drawing mentioned in the first verse. For the recording, I played his ukulele.

10. Carla Williams Kissed Me expand | collapse
"Carla Williams" sings better than her real name. Carla is a real person, though. I heard about her from my friend and fellow songwriter Jamie Purnell. When he was in high school (or maybe it was middle school) and the most popular girl in school, Carla Williams, asked him to help her with her math homework, he excitedly thought she was asking him out. Turned out, she just wanted help with her homework.

11. For Love expand | collapse
If you’re from immigration … or Alberta … please remember that this is comedy.

I really do miss living in the US, especially great Mexican food and my mom. Not necessarily in that order.

12. The Lucky Ones expand | collapse
I wrote this after overhearing a conversation that broke my heart.

13. Hold Me expand | collapse

14. Menopause Mambo expand | collapse
I have an older song, "Menstrual Tango." After extensive personal research, I’ve written a sequel.

Rachel, feel free to call me.

Big thanks to Gail Dorks Anderson – this album wouldn’t have been possible without your generous support – and to everyone else who had a hand in getting it done, from housing to funding to helping me choose the songs: Jacque Allen and Barbara Benisch, April Applegate, Jim Bossert, Denise Breard, Deb Brewster, Kathleen Burns, Anne M. Fete, Pat Laberge, Larry Fenske, Ellie Grace, Suzy Higgins, Mary Hocks, Lois Hoover, Valerie Horton, Gini Ingram, Leslie D. Judd, Mark Knox, Mary Alicia Lyons and Paula Childers, Michelle Marquand and Debra Brewer, Karen Munro-Caple, Sue Norton-Scott and Will Scott, Claudia Pitts, Janice Rickert, Ronald Waite, Trish Williams, Chris Wilson, Lorali Wyant and Jill Waller, anonymous, and all of the musicians who went the extra mile (note?). Chris Rosser, I promise you can scat sing on the next album.



cover of the new cd: better than chocolate

Here are the songs from Better Than Chocolate -- click on ‘expand’ to see details.

  • All songs written by Jamie Anderson. She also produced this release and ate copious amounts of dark chocolate.

  • Buy it now from CD Baby or iTunes!

1. January expand | collapse

2. Public Radio expand | collapse

3. My Dad Loves to Sing expand | collapse

4. Her Problem Now expand | collapse

5. Ghost Song expand | collapse

Front and back photos by Janice Rickert. Band photo on back by Woodland Willow Photography. Design by Sally Rogers Devine at Red Horse Graphics. Mastering by Charlie Pilzer at Airshow.

Many thanks to Linda M. Betzer (in loving memory of Candace A. Prebil), Tracy Boland and Deb Quentel, BJ Burch, Robin D. Gelman, Patrice Huettl, Cheryl Hruby, Pat Laberge, Brandie Mann, Bonnie Maxwell and Crystal Henry, Sue Norton-Scott and Will Scott, Connie Russell, Cynthia Stranis, and Martha Young.




cover of the new cd: three bridges Here are the songs and liner notes from Three Bridges -- click on 'expand' to see details. Afterwards is more information about each album.


2007 marks my 20th year of touring. I can't imagine a better celebration than to release an album like this one, a showcase of some of my most requested songs. I wish I could've put the liner notes in a beautiful thick CD booklet but I didn't have a Trump budget. Much better hair, though. So, here's the rest of what I wanted to say. Settle in with a cup of coffee. Heck, make a pot. You know how we musicians are, especially when we get to talk about our music.

In 1987 my friend Martie van der Voort and I decided we wanted to attend the Michigan Women's Music Festival. If only we didn't live in Arizona. Hey! We're musicians, we can book a tour. Martie brightly exclaimed, "We'll pretend we're booking agents!" and off we went. I've been collecting tiny motel soaps ever since.

I've crossed many bridges with this crazy touring life, playing in thirty seven states and four countries, in over a thousand venues, from the 1993 March on Washington for GLBT rights (for a mere few hundred thousand people) to small house concerts. I missed Montana and both Dakotas but I've played in Alaska, in Hawaii, on a couple of Caribbean islands and heck, I've been happy to perform in Kokomo and Boise -- wherever there's someone who wants to hear my tunes.

It's fitting that I dedicate this album to Dakota. No, not the state, but my (now ex) partner who wisely commented, "You don't want to wake up when you're 80 and say, I wish I'd done that." I did it. And I'm still doing it. (I hope she's not mad about the break up songs. Hey, it's art.)

I also want to dedicate this to my fans. If it wasn't for you, I'd be singing in my living room for my house plants. They don't applaud. Not only did you clap but you cheered me on in countless ways. I love you all.

On May 11, 2007, when I traipsed into AirShow Mastering with my original master tapes and CDs, Charlie Pilzer, the engineer, smiled and raised an eyebrow. "Let's get most of these songs from the CDs" he calmly said, "And if we need to go back to the original studio tape, we will." We had to do just that for three of the cuts. Fortunately, he had an old reel-to-reel machine. I crossed every appendage as he loaded a tape that hadn't been played in 15 years. Every couple of minutes he'd hit stop, pull up the tape, and wipe the heads with a cotton swab and alcohol, removing a layer of mildew and dust. I'll be damned if the tapes played. It brought me right back to being a nervous new performer, wondering what the bejesus I was doing in that big studio, recording my little songs.

All songs written by Jamie Anderson, except "A Family of Friends," by Sue Fink and Jamie Anderson; and "Where the Water Runs Deep," by Lois Hoover and Jamie Anderson.

1. Three Bridges expand | collapse

2. Drive All Night expand | collapse

3. Beautiful expand | collapse

4. One Out of Three expand | collapse

5. My Dad Loves to Sing expand | collapse

6. Too Busy Being Blue expand | collapse

7. I Wanna Be a Straight Guy expand | collapse

8. Grace expand | collapse

9. Dark Chocolate expand | collapse

10. Mama Come Quick expand | collapse

11. When Cats Take Over the World expand | collapse

12. Loretta and Bernadine expand | collapse

13. I Don't Know About the Night expand | collapse

14. Her Problem Now expand | collapse

15. Menstrual Tango expand | collapse

16. A Family of Friends expand | collapse

17.5. Where the Water Runs Deep expand | collapse


Here's more about the albums where I got these songs:

2005, A Promise of Light, produced and engineered by Kiya Heartwood, recorded at Outlaw Hill Studios in Stamping Ground, KY; mixed by Karen Kane at Overdub Lane in Durham, NC. expand | collapse

2001, Listen, produced by Kara Barnard, recorded at Overdub Lane in Durham, NC, engineered by Wes Lachot. expand | collapse

1999, Drive All Night, produced by Jim Henry and recorded at Signature Sounds Studio in Palmer, MA, engineered by Mark Thayer. expand | collapse

1995, Never Assume, produced by Lisa Koch and recorded by David Lange at David Lange Studios in Edgewood, WA (near Seattle). expand | collapse

1992, Center of Balance, produced by Dakota and Jamie, recorded by Steve English at the Sound Factory in Tucson, AZ. expand | collapse

1986, Heart Resort, produced by Jamie and recorded by Taylor Smith at the Sound Factory, Tucson, AZ. expand | collapse

There are a few other albums but I haven't included songs from them. A Family of Friends was released in mid 1993. It's a compilation I co-produced with Sue Fink and Dakota and contained the first recorded version of that song. Bad Hair Day was released late in 1993 and was a collection of funny songs, mostly from earlier albums. My first real album was Closer to Home, released in 1989 and while I haven't included any cuts from that one, it does contain my first recording of "Dark Chocolate." If you want one of those, I still have 2 boxes of LPs in my garage. The mildew is free.

� ® 2010 Tsunami Recordings (Jamie Anderson) - All Rights Reserved

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